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Process of Installing an Insulated Precast Foundation for a Modular Home


Modular Home and Insulated Precast FoundationInsulated precast foundation walls simplify basement construction, save time and money. The walls comprise high-strength concrete panels manufactured off site. Each panel contains solid concrete studs for load-bearing support and a built-in concrete footing. Some panels include rigid insulation to keep the basement warmer and rebar and polypropylene fibers for strength. Walls can be customized by project to allow for door and window openings, steel-beam pockets and brick ledges.

Manufacturers offer other convenience features such as built-in access for wiring and plumbing and wood or steel nailers for easy drywall installation. Panels range in size from 2 to 12 feet wide by 8 to 12 feet high to accommodate a variety of basement configurations.

The cost of insulated precast foundation systems is competitive with the cost of other foundation walls. A precast concrete foundation is best-used to construct a full basement with consistent sill height; different wall heights slow the process, minimizing the cost benefit. Installers who aren’t familiar with precast concrete panel assembly will need additional training. Some manufacturers allow only certified installers to deliver and erect their systems.

Steps on How the  Insulated Precast Foundation is Installed

Constructing a basement using precast foundation walls includes preparing the gravel base, placing and connecting the panels, installing a capillary break, installing the flooring and backfilling.

After the site is excavated and perimeter drainpipe is laid, a bed of clean, compacted gravel is prepared over the drainpipe. The gravel facilitates sub-slab drainage—water drains down the panels, through the gravel bed and into the perimeter drain system. The gravel also transfers the load from the foundation wall to the surrounding soil. The gravel layer will be 4 to 12 inches thick, as determined by a soils engineer, to meet the foundation’s load-bearing needs.

Next, a crane is used to place the first concrete panel. It’s braced, and a second panel is placed to form a corner. The joint is sealed with a urethane sealant, and the panels are bolted together. Additional panels are placed in the same fashion, usually without needing any bracing. All corner joints are mitered, and all other joints butt together. Once all panels are placed, sealed and bolted, any code-required waterproofing is applied.

Next, a 4- to 6-inch layer of gravel is spread over the slab footprint. A 10-mil vapor barrier is installed on top of the gravel layer, covering the entire footprint of the foundation. Together, these form a capillary break between moisture in the soil and the underside of the basement slab.

Finally, the basement slab is poured and floor joists are installed above the insulated precast foundation. Both of these provide bracing for the foundation walls before backfilling begins—the concrete slab anchors the bottom, and the floor framing locks the top. The foundation is then backfilled and can be considered complete.

In case you still have question about modular homes and insulated precast foundation, you may contact Legendary Homes Inc in Jackson, Michigan. A representative will be happy to assist you. Meanwhile you can check our modular home price sheets by signing up to our blog

Topic: Insulated Precast Foundation


Materials Use in the Construction of an Insulated Precast Foundation


The insulated precast foundation is as important as any other element of your modular home. It’s what takes all of the loads from the roof to the walls to the floors, and it takes them and transfers them into your soil. Insulated Precast Foundation and Modular HomeInsulated precast foundation can provide an economical and attractive method to protect and enclose the modular home. Its use is mostly in commercial and residential projects. And there are different materials utilize for precast foundations structurally and its. Precast concrete wall panels may be supported on almost any kind of footing but mostly on pad footings at panel corners and strip footings. Slabs are usually poured between panels and sometimes assist support of panels. Ideally, precast wall panels should be joined at their edges or their top with fixings designed to absorb minor movements without distress but this is not always done.

Insulated Precast Foundation Material: Masonry (CMUs)

Masonry is used by modular home contractors in erecting the insulated precast foundation because it has 2,500psi and moderate permeability. It is built on site, and on labor intensive. Using this material can be overwhelming as its construction can be affected by the weather and it has a high site impact which approximately has 5 to 10 days.

Insulated Precast Foundation Material: Wood

Wood is one of the materials placed in the insulated precast foundation that has a high permeability and moderate site impact. Though it has a 7,000 psi, it can provide buckling concerns.

Insulated Precast Foundation Material: Precast Concrete

Most general contractors, especially in Jackson, prefer to utilize the precast concrete for the modular home foundation. The precast concrete is usually built in a factory and is delivered on the site through a truck. Aside from the minimal delay during it’s on- site completion, its construction is fast because it cannot be hampered by any weather disturbance. Precast concrete is panelized which means it has joints for expansion and contraction. Additionally, precast concrete has low permeability and has a 5,000 psi.

In case you still have question about modular homes and insulated precast foundation, you may contact Legendary Homes Inc in Jackson, Michigan. A representative will be happy to assist you. Meanwhile you can check our modular home price sheets by signing up to our blog

Topic: Insulated Precast Foundation


Types of Construction Used to Erect the Insulated Precast Foundation


Modular Home and Insulated Precast FoundationThe type of construction affects how an insulated precast foundation may be damaged, cracked, settled, or moved. Each type of precast foundation, however, has their own unique characteristics and provide certain number of benefits.

Precast foundation walls simplify basement construction, save time and money, and result in warmer, drier basements. The walls comprise high-strength concrete panels manufactured off site. Each panel contains solid concrete studs for load-bearing support and a built-in concrete footing. Some panels include rigid insulation to keep the basement warmer and rebar and polypropylene fibers for strength. Walls can be customized by project to allow for door and window openings, steel-beam pockets and brick ledges. Manufacturers offer other convenience features such as built-in access for wiring and plumbing an
d wood or steel nailers for easy drywall installation. Panels range in size from 2 to 12 feet wide by 8 to 12 feet high to accommodate a variety of basement configurations.

Insulated Precast Foundation: Crawl spaces

Insulated precast foundation – wall height is a key factor in predicting crawl space failures. Special crawl space wall and knee-wall reinforcement is required in earthquake areas.

Insulated Precast Foundation: Basement

Wall height vs block width/reinforcement: taller basement walls may require additional reinforcement to resist buckling and bulging.

Insulated Precast Foundation: Actual footing

This type of constructing an insulated precast foundation is usually not visible, that is, the poured footing, or gravel, or other details that are below ground may be inferred, known from photographs taken during construction, supposed from building plans and drawings, but the actual details are buried unless excavation is performed to permit an inspection.

In case you still have question about modular homes and insulated precast foundation, you may contact Legendary Homes Inc in Jackson, Michigan. A representative will be happy to assist you. Meanwhile you can check our modular home price sheets by signing up to our blog

Topic: Insulated Precast Foundation


Insulated Precast Foundation Walls for Modular Home Basement


Most modular home contractors would prefer to cast insulated precast foundation walls for their customers. For concrete contractors, either erecting or actually casting precast panels could be a lucrative addition to your modular home.

Modular Home and Insulated Precast FoundationThe most popular insulated precast foundation walls come with a nearly a highly insulated finished panels and interior studs ready to accept drywall. Construction of the precast foundation can proceed in virtually any weather without concern about freezing or wet conditions. Insulated precast foundation erection is also simpler than cast-in-place or ICF construction and can be done by low-skilled workers with only one trained lead.

Benefits of Insulated Precast Foundation

Insulated precast foundation come in various configurations, and gives several benefits. Thicker insulation can increase that to R-21, leaving highly efficient walls for the basement.The insulated precast foundation walls can incorporate window or door openings. There are no stock panels; walls are cast specifically for each project and each panel is cast with its neighbor to match exactly.

This insulated precast foundation system results in crack-free and waterproof walls. The walls are made with 5000-psi concrete with low permeability. Since the concrete is cast in a factory setting, all shrinkage has taken place prior to erection of the walls so panels virtually never crack in service. A broom finish is standard for the exterior of the panels, although other finishes are available, including simulated brick or flagstone textures.

Construction of Insulated Precast Foundation

The base for insulated precast foundation panels is crushed, compacted gravel—no footing is poured. After excavation, 4 inches of ½-inch crushed stone is placed and compacted with a drainage system beneath. This base is adequate for most soils and loading conditions.

The panels are shipped from the factory through a crane. Panels for a typical modular home can be shipped using two or three trailers. Erection is handled with a crew of three or four workers, including at least one lead worker who is certified in the process by the manufacturer. Panels are lifted with a specialized sling and strong back.

Once all panels are in place, a vapor retarder is placed and a 4-inch basement slab is poured. Prior to backfilling, both the slab and the floor joists or trusses must be in place. Some subcontractors also provide hollow-core concrete planks for floors. Waterproofing, drainage panels, or both is applied to the outside face of the panels where needed.

In case you still have question about modular homes, you may contact Legendary Homes Inc in Jackson, Michigan. A representative will be happy to assist you. Meanwhile you can check our modular home price sheets by signing up to our blog

Topic: Insulated Precast Foundation


Guide to Insulated Precast Foundation: Precast Foundation Walls vs. Poured Walls


Modular Home and Insulated Precast FoundationGet to know the difference of an insulated precast foundation and a poured basement before starting the construction process with your modular home contractor.

Construction Time Insulated Precast Foundation Walls vs. Poured Basement Walls

Installation of the insulated precast foundation walls and poured basement walls can be completed quickly – often in just a day or two and are not as susceptible to weather delays. Precast foundation walls are poured in a factory setting, assuring the quality of cement mix (no extra water is added on site, which can weaken the concrete).

psi of Insulated Precast Foundation Walls vs. Poured Basement Walls

Insulated precast foundation walls are typically poured at a higher psi – around 5000.  Poured basement walls are a lower 3500 psi. However, the poured wall is solid throughout rather than 24” on center, so it doesn’t need the stiffer mix necessarily.

Drainage System for Insulated Precast Foundation Walls vs. Poured Basement Walls

Pea gravel footing of precast option allows for superior drainage.  Rising water under the basement slab can flow to the footing tile through the crushed rock footing.  On a poured wall system, water has to get around the concrete footing to reach the tile, which builds pressure, or flow into a secondary tile inside the footing to get out.

Certain soil types that are weaker (sandy, silt) are not ideal for insulated precast foundations.

Use of a insulated precast foundation system requires a little more coordination on the part of the general contractor, including scheduling rock delivery, flatwork, excavation and tile work. Precast foundation option reduces the chance for stress cracks in the wall system with controlled joints in the panels, but relies heavily on sealant to keep water out.

Warranty of Insulated Precast Foundation Walls vs. Poured Basement Walls

Precast options may come with a warranty.  Superior Walls carries a 15 year limited warranty. Poured walls usually do not have a guarantee. Precast walls are pre insulated and ready for drywall.  The concrete studs have holes to accommodate plumbing and electrical.

Cost of Insulated Precast Foundation Walls vs. Poured Basement Walls

Precast systems are relatively new in the residential field and homeowners, building officials, flatwork contractors, and builders alike are skeptical of them.  Builders may charge more to build on a precast system because of the learning curve.  There are a few minor extra steps that must be taken (mainly additional bracing and a delay in backfill) with the precast system that will increase the labor costs from the builder.  Do your homework and choose a builder that has experience with the precast system installation, or you may pay for it.

In case you still have question about modular homes, you may contact Legendary Homes Inc in Jackson, Michigan. A representative will be happy to assist you. Meanwhile you can check our modular home price sheets by signing up to our blog

Topic: Insulated Precast Foundation

Reviews


Todd was full of information and it was great to see a CLEAN home! My husband is glad to hear that u can sub co tract everything out so there is no worry on our end if we choose to go that way. I really enjoyed seeing the pictures of the different styles of homes you have built.

Apr 30, 2013
Jennifer Plank

We first met Todd Rutledge from Legendary Homes of Jackson MI online while we were searching for a new home. After our first conversation with him, we felt that he was honest and trustworthy. These feelings were confirmed by another of his clients who let us see her home and told us of her experiences working with Todd. Todd arranged a visit to the Redman Homes factory for us so we could see for ourselves how they are made and their quality. Todd helped us thru the process of selecting what we wanted in our home. He made himself available to answer our questions thru out this building process. If he didn't know all the answers, he found out and got back with us promptly. We now are the Happy owners of our Redman home and are very thankful to Todd Rutledge of Legendary Homes for his help. Sincerely, Burt and Mary Hooker 5/16/13

May 18, 2013
Burt Hooker

Answered all our questions about modular homes and the building process and had good knowledge, politeness and overall Excellent Representative. Good Job!

May 25, 2013
Richard Walter

 


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